Manifesting Wishes

On the Spirit Companion Yahoogroup, a member asked for Meridjet and others to sound off on books such as The Secret that espouse manifesting your reality. The one she referenced said that whatever you ask for is immediately granted. She also wondered about impossible wishes, such as making a person look different or regrow an amputated limb, etc, and asked for feedback. Meridjet replied after “D.” the SC of another member. I’ll leave his reply out until I get permission to use it, but you’ll get the gist from Meridjet’s reply.

Meridjet Speaks —

D. has answered true — the old tale of the “Monkey’s Paw” demonstrates how a wish granted can do more harm than good, even when a person has taken pains to state their desire clearly. In tales of genies and similar wish-fulfilling beings, we see the characters (I’m reminded here of an old X-Files episode) striving to exclude in their request every negative outcome they can think of, yet there is always something they’ve forgotten. Even Mulder’s wish for “Peace on Earth” went awry, as every human aside from him immediately ceased to exist. Peaceful, yes. What he really wanted? Hardly.

Even when we’re certain that we can handle any negative result to our wishes granted, we cannot possibly conceive of everything. If you wish for prosperity or wealth (which seems to be the main focus of these books on manifesting your reality) and it is granted, it’s going to bring its own problems with it. But this is not really the crux of the issue. I have two things to address.

First of all, to answer the general question of “Is everything we ask for immediately granted?”, I have to say no. It’s always a matter of timing, not so much in coming up with the perfect idea at the perfect moment to make a million bucks, but in what is right for us on our life journeys at that time. Clearly, if you ask for something that you do not truly believe you deserve, it will be held at bay by your own doubts. If it were offered in spite of your doubts (as does occur), your disbelief in your worthiness would corrupt it as you sought to find the flaw in it, the flaw that rendered you worthy. This effort, whether conscious or not, creates an atmosphere of self-destructiveness, until the wonderful thing is broken and you are vindicated, exclaiming, “See there! I knew there was something wrong with it.” Until you allow yourself to accept a gift with genuine gratitude, you cannot see it for the gift it is. You see only the proof that you are destined not to have this thing.

Secondly, and more importantly in my opinion, is that each thing that happens to us, whether “good” or “bad,” has something intrinsic to it that is meant to help us grow. If you are working on a lesson in worthiness (to continue with my example above), you cannot move on to a lesson in how to trust, commit, open to, or truly embrace your blessings. You might be showered in blessings and never recognize them because all of your attention is focused on the lesson of the moment. While many people appear to have it easy, born into privilege and only gaining more talent/ beauty/ money/ fame as they go through life, it’s never as simple as it appears on the surface. Most people have a public face that they use with all but their most trusted confidantes. You can’t see their problems because they know how to hide them. They may look at life from a sort of business perspective, and it’s always good business to shine.

Once we have, individually, accepted that there is more depth to life than surface — once we have embraced a truly spiritual or contemplative way of living — we find our life’s lessons intensifying accordingly. While other, less introverted, people may have enormous problems, they cope with them much differently. When more of the coping is internalized and we, to use Sheta’s word, “Process” them without a constant focus on the pragmatic, we go farther faster. And once this process has started, it’s very difficult to go back. It’s like taking the red pill and waking up outside the Matrix — we can’t forget, we can’t go back to who we used to be.

Our lessons, then, provide for us precisely what we need to understand in the larger process of our lives, and it is up to us to assimilate these before we can move on to the next one. We might be able to alter our circumstances enough that we believe we’ve moved on, but as the old saying goes, “Wherever you go, there you are.” Your issues and problems, your lessons, will be back and will not be put aside forever. Can you wish your way into a carefree life, or into a mansion with servants, or into the perfect relationship? Maybe on the surface. But you don’t live on the surface, do you? It’s what’s underneath that matters, what’s going on inside you. The rest is window dressing.

So wish all you like, but until you’ve built the foundation for your wishes to stand upon, they’re never going to be what you envision.

All my best,
Meridjet

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